“I was scared to get help,” says Hugh about Singing

The Telegraph has posted a great new article on Hugh Jackman, talking about a range of subjects. Most of it is information fans may already know about, but there’s the occasional tidbit that causes pause. For example, did you know he took singing lessons only two years ago to “relearn the wheel”? The article has been added to the press archive, although you can read an excerpt below and go straight to the source to read more:

Hugh Jackman has just wolfed down 12 ounces of filet mignon and steamed green beans. It’s 4pm, and this is his fifth meal of the day. One of Hollywood’s consummate shape-shifters, Jackman is currently beefing up to once again play Wolverine, animalistic star of the X-Men films. He tells me he has three different wardrobes, which he rotates according to the type of film he’s making: “thin suits, Hugh suits and fat suits”.

We meet in a creamy-coloured hotel suite in Beverly Hills. Jackman is wearing a T-shirt, dark jeans, and looks lean and chiselled. Unusually for an actor, he doesn’t take himself at all seriously and has not an ounce of self-consciousness. Which is a good thing, considering what his new film is about. Real Steel is set in a near-future in which giant robots box each other to the death for the entertainment of the masses. Jackman plays an underdog trainer rebuilding his relationship with his son as they work together on rebuilding a robot. Of course he does.

I know what you’re thinking, because I thought it too. But Real Steel is an unexpected delight, a mix of RoboCop and The Champ filled with heart, and Jackman’s screen charisma. It seems the man who makes Broadway hoofing seem macho can also give steel warmth.

Jackman understands my scepticism. “For a year and a half people have been saying to me, ‘What are you doing? A robot boxing movie?’” he says, turning his nose up in an expression of mock befuddlement. “But it’s a tale of redemption. My character gets a second chance but sometimes that second chance is more frightening than the first because you know what to expect.” Does he mean he’s more comfortable with pain than with trying to succeed?

“Exactly. That’s what fascinated me about Charlie [his character], and that’s what happens to all of us. We repeat behaviour and start blaming everything outside ourselves for why things are going this way. It’s much easier dealing with disappointment.” Does he think he’s ever done that? “Yeah. In some ways we’re all like that.” He searches unprompted for an example. “This is the first thing that comes to mind. I’ve been asked a couple of times to sing and I get quite nervous.”

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